Mental Health, Prayer, Theology

Close the Door


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The therapeutic benefit of closing my bedroom door has never ceased to amaze me: it’s unlike any other door to close and one that uniquely accentuates a defined sense of oneness with myself, my wife and with my God.

It’s the nearest thing on this planet to glory.

The subject of Christian prayer is not uncommon and therefore neither are Jesus’ teachings from Matthew 6:6 where He tells us to go into our rooms and to close the door.

Have you ever felt the therapy that this brings? Even at the end of a very good day, closing the bedroom door does something profoundly important:

Closing the door brings a practice of His presence, a sense of my inward focus on the audiences of One, a company comprised of Three. I get to see.

Closing the door also brings the practice of my being seen and forgiven – a sense of being unveiled in His sight despite the dross of the day. I get to be seen.

As you go about the rest of your day, wherever you are in the world, in whichever time zone or state of mind, please, God willing, draw to the end of it and make time for this conscious closing of your door.

Then, punch in your secret numbers in sequence, thumb up the control centre and tap – with just as much deliberate intention – the spectacular little airplane symbol found within.

Another door will close, a door within a door, and the world outside will again be kept at bay.

Otherwise, take your prayer chair to the nearest shopping centre around, sit on it in the middle of the busiest part and continue the insanity there.

What do you think?

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